Category Archives: ONE MONTH ONE PICTURE

CROSS-LIGHTING TWILIGHT

DEEPThe Deep Sealife Centre, Hull, East Yorkshire

For those of us with a predilection for wild places, it can be rewarding and refreshing to turn our attention to the urban landscape. Continue reading »

CREPUSCULAR CREATURES

Castlerigg, Cumbria

Castlerigg, Cumbria

Although there are obvious directional differences, the colour palettes of dawn and dusk are essentially identical but sequenced in reverse. Landscape photographers are crepuscular creatures, we tend to function most creatively at twilight, be it dawn or dusk. Continue reading »

BULLSEYE COMPOSITION

Walking to Lindisfarne

Causeway, Holy Island, Northumberland

Edward Weston said that “to consult rules of composition before making a picture is a little like consulting the law of gravity before going for a walk”. He felt that adhering too closely to such rules inhibited “freshness of vision” and resulted in “tedious repetition of pictorial clichés”. However, even a cursory study of modern landscape photography will quickly reveal that such compositional rules are still frequently utilized, to great effect. Continue reading »

SUBJECT, PHOTOGRAPHER, VIEWER

Dordogne Barn

I made this simple image of a barn among trees in a spring meadow during a trip to the Dordogne several years ago. I had spent a particularly relaxing and creative week shooting landscapes while travelling south through France. This picturesque scene was overflowing with visual metaphors. A spring meadow celebrating new beginnings, vibrant greenery, cherry blossom and the iconic barn symbolizing man’s harnessing of nature. Continue reading »

SECOND CHANCE SUNSET

Cape Cornwall, West Cornwall

Pointing our cameras towards the sun can often create dramatic images. Overall contrast is obviously maximized, but because foreground and middle-ground objects are being illuminated from the other side, they are rendered as desaturated low-contrast silhouettes. There is a controllable degree of textural detail within these shadows, depending on choice of exposure and subsequent digital processing. Continue reading »

DAYLIGHT COLOURS

Anderby Creek

The enchanting colours of twilight provide eternal appeal for the landscape photographer. Moreover, as darkness falls we often enjoy harnessing the potential of long-exposures. We may then allow time to reveal itself, smearing cloudy skies and water into a beautiful homogenous blur, introducing a compelling new dimension to mitigate the loss of spatial depth inherent in our two-dimensional imagery. Continue reading »

SHOOTING THE STORM

LANDS-END

I have visited this place several times in the hope of capturing a pre-visualised image of these huge rocks receding into the distance like giant stepping stones towards Longships Lighthouse. A simple but powerful image of the beautiful pink afterglow once the sun has set, complementing the deep blues of dusk. Alas, on this particular visit, I was no closer to realising my intended scene. Continue reading »

A FLEETING OPPORTUNITY

LOCH GARRY

The slow methodical approach of the large-format photographer has much to offer the inquisitive SLR user. Taking more time over our photography, adopting a more disciplined workflow and meticulous attention to composition can help us to create compelling imagery. Continue reading »

A FAMILIAR PLACE

GREEN VISTA

That abandoned barn or lonely tree we pass everyday on the way to work is so commonplace, so mundane that it either gets ignored, or merely pencilled in to the ‘possibles’ list. It can be more difficult finding inspiration in everyday places than in unfamiliar places or photographically iconic locations for which we already have a vast mental repository of images to whet the creative appetite. Continue reading »

SCALLOP

SCALLOP

Maggi Hambling created Scallop, a four metre high steel sculpture bearing the words “I hear those voices that will not be drowned” from the opera Peter Grimes, as a tribute to Benjamin Britten.

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